The Creative Revolution: How Video Creators Are Teaching Themselves

The Creative Revolution: How Video Creators Are Teaching Themselves

A new generation of creators are here, and they’ve arrived on their own terms. With more access to non-traditional education and a shift towards flexible working, the power is truly in their hands. And some are taking the opportunity with both hands...

With the Vidsy Big Creator Survey, we wanted to know how creatives work, what drives them to create, and where they think the industry is heading. In the second part of the series, we’re exploring how a new generation of video creators are carving new routes into the creative industry.

Getting a foot in the door of the creative industry is more competitive than ever, but that hasn’t fazed many. Whether fresh or established, switching careers or just getting started, the self-taught revolution is here and you’re going to want to embrace it…


SUPPLY AND DEMAND

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The creative industry is growing, and it’s growing fast. Since the beginning of the millennium, the global creative economy has more than doubled, from $202bn in 2002 to a massive $509bn. In countries like the UK, the creative industry is growing 3x faster than any other industry.

The demand is there, and self-taught creators are supplying the skills needed when formal education can’t keep up. Our Big Creator Survey showed that 43% of creators now identify as self-taught, and it can only be expected that this will overtake the 47% who learned their trade at college or university within the next couple of years, if not sooner.


LEARNING NEW SKILLS

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One of the main challenges when it comes to the creative industry is establishing your skills. And now it’s easier than ever before to learn new skills. The internet has opened gateways to worlds that were previously inaccessible. An infinite resource of tutorials, courses and communities, you can try your hand at anything that takes your fancy, from juggling bowling pins to nailing that glitch effect in After Effects.

The challenge is finding valuable content that you can trust. Although 85% of creators learn new skills using free YouTube tutorials, and 40% get stuck into free blogs and guides, our Big Creator Survey showed that people aren’t afraid to splash a little cash when it comes to accessing education. 35% use paid online courses to master advanced techniques, and we’ve put together a list of our creator’s favourite haunts:

School of Motion
School of Motion is the perfect place to build your confidence has a motion designer, with “hardcore courses” on both 2D and 3D animation. They mix home tasks with high-quality video lessons and support materials.

Lynda.com (now Linkedin Learning)
LinkedIn Learning offers video courses taught by experts in software, creative and business skills. They have monthly and annual plans, which could be a good option if you’re hoping to absorb as much information as possible in a short timeframe.

Domestika
The largest  Spanish-language creative community. Domestika is bursting at the seams with courses for creative minds. Join a community that is one million strong, and learn with top professionals in the creative field.

Skillshare
Want to get hands-on with your learning? Skillshare specialises on education through interaction, rather than lecturing, with the primary goal of learning by completing a project. It’s a subscription-based system too, so fill your boots.


WORK FROM ANYWHERE

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As we covered in our first Big Creator Survey article, the creative industry has evolved into a majority freelance model, with 58% of creators identifying as predominantly freelance. This shift from Monday to Friday office work is happening quickly, with more and more creators taking control and working for themselves.

The biggest obstacle with working for yourself, other than securing work in the first place, is finding an affordable workspace. Co-working spaces can be pricey, and hogging that table in your local cafe is going to rack up quite the bill after your sixth coffee of the day.

Instead, we’ve truly thrown out the rulebook when it comes to your workspace, with a huge 79% of creative freelancers working from home. And, as we discovered recently, there’s a hundred ways to do just that. Whether you curl up on a beanbag in your pyjamas or curate your perfect home office and don your best suit, creators are making these untraditional choices work.

Our Big Creator Survey has captured insights from every corner of the creative industry.


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